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Bookends: Investigators baffled by what lies beneath January 31, 2017

Posted by klondykewriter in Bookends, mystery, Science Fiction, Whitehorse Star.
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Bookends: Investigators baffled by what lies beneath

By Dan Davidsonfirewalk

December 28, 2016

– 847 words –

 

Firewalk

By Chris Roberson

Night Shade Books

348 pages

$24.99

 

Zombies. They’re everywhere. The original horror flicks, back as far as the George Romero classic, were vague about what caused them, but the condition was infectious and the diet was human brains. I saw the original Night of the Living Dead back in college and have had no desire to see further renditions over the years.

The Resident Evil series introduced the idea that moved the plague away from the supernatural and made it into something humans might cause by means of evil science.

In other versions, the condition is caused by a virus or is some form of disease.

Stephen King’s Cell has the condition being triggered by a rogue cellphone signal that shuts down the brain’s higher functions.

Chris Roberson and artist Michael Allred created the comic book iZombie, in which an unfortunate combination of an energy drink and a designer drug triggers a zombie reaction. This can also be passed on by a bite or scratch. It can be controlled and the victims can only continue to function as normal humans by ingesting small quantities of human brain material. In zombie mode they possess unnatural strength and resilience.

After eating of another person’s brain they have access to that person’s memories and personality traits. The central character in the series, and in the television show now in its third season, is a victim named Olivia Moore (so, of course, Liv Moore). She is a former medical student who gets her require grey matter by working in the city morgue.

In Firewalk, Roberson, who writes fantasy novels as well as comic books, has come at the idea from a different angle, in what promises to be the first book in a new series. This is framed as a mystery/thriller, but it’s in familiar zombie territory and has echoes of iZombie.

Five years ago Izzie Lefevre, of the FBI’s Behavioral Analysis Unit, and Detective Patrick Tevake, on the Recondito Police Force, were instrumental in tracking down and ending the career of a serial killer, a scientist named Nicholas Fuller, who had left a dozen sword decapitated bodies in his wake before they cornered him.

What is unusual about both partners is that their family backgrounds, which they both try to ignore, have exposed them to lore and legend which allows them to see what might be supernatural significance in events which have begun to occur in the city again.

Izzie’s grandmother was a voodoo priestess. Patrick’s Polynesian great-uncle believed that there were special places on earth where the walls between worlds were thin.

There is a new street drug called Ink, so-called because prolonged use of it causes its addicts to break out in ink-like blotches on their skin. It also causes them to want to avoid sunlight and, when gathered in groups, to behave in a herd-like manner, as if being controlled by a single intelligence.

When violent individuals in the final stages of this addiction are killed by decapitation, autopsies reveal that there are large empty spots in their brains, much like what happens to victims of variant Creutzfeldt-Jacob disease, sometimes called Mad Cow Disease. The condition is identical to that found in the brains of Fuller’s victims from five years earlier. It is this coincidence that causes Tevake to request that Lefevre return to Recondito to compare notes with him.

The final straw for them both is the death of an Ink pusher who continues to rise from the ground and try to assault them after nearly every bone in his body has been broken by a fall and he has been shot enough times to take down a horse. Only after his neck has been broken so thoroughly that it is barely attached to his body, does he stop moving, and the Ink blotches fade from his skin.

They begin to wonder if Fuller hadn’t been killing the people he did for a specific, and perhaps very good, reason. His victims were all participants in a series of experiments that took place in an abandoned mine shaft, as part of a project called Undersight.

“Gravity leaks into other spaces, but doors swing both ways. They went down into the dark,” Fuller said of his victims before they died, “and the dark came back with them. Ridden. Passengers. I saw it, even if no one else did.”

He’d killed 12 people in horrible ways, but there was a number 13, someone he called the student, and five years later that man was continuing the work Fuller had tried to stop.

Before the book ends the two investigators, and a couple of other people who get roped into the case, find the true source of Ink, are chased by a zombie horde, find sanctuary in a light house, and realize they have a lot more work to do, The story will continue in the next book, Firewalkers. I’ll be looking for it. This one was fun.

 

-30-

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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