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Bookends – Getting Ready for Another National Birthday Celebration February 17, 2017

Posted by klondykewriter in Bookends, Klondike Sun, Whitehorse Star.
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Bookends – Getting Ready for Another National Birthday Celebration

By Dan Davidson

November 30, 2016canada-history

– 815 words –

 

Canada – An Illustrated History

By Derek Hayes

Douglas and McIntyre

296 pages

$36.95

 

With Canada’s 150th birthday coming up, it might just be a good time to dip into this highly readable short history of our nation. This is a “revised and expanded” edition of a work that originally came out in hardbound copy in 2004. Apparently the final chapter, “The Third Millennium”, contains the bulk of the new material. The publisher indicates there weren’t that many more changes, and the increased page count seems to fit with that addition.

The book is a lovely package, a well-bound paperback with over 450 illustrations, ranging from photographs to historical paintings and maps, as well as posters, stamps, cartoons, stained glass and tapestries. In the section on Louisbourg one of the paintings was a wall mural that I saw on display there last summer. There is full colour throughout and not a single page without some type of illustration – though there are some pages that have no words.

The publishers’ notes indicate: “The book covers the events, the newsmakers, and the ordinary folk that shaped the Canadian experience. Here are tales of the famous, the infamous, the popular, and the unknown: the natives, the nation-builders, the separatists, and the statesmen; the soldiers, the settlers, the rebels, and the refugees; the artists, the astronauts, the invaders, and the inventors; the motorists, the mail carriers, the fur traders, and the photographers—a myriad of individuals who shaped our country.”

Don’t let that generic list or the table of contents fool you. While they read like a standard history of Canada, marching on from First Nations habitation through the Vikings, French, English, wars, rebellions, Confederation, and on to the present day, there are a lot of sidebars on specific issues or trends that stand out from the main text by having a different background colour and a different type of content. Some are single page segments, but most are two page spreads.

These are the pages where the book gets away from the military and political themes that used to dominate historical writing and begins to deal with social issues. There are sections on the plague ships that led to quarantine islands, the 19th century’s discovery of oil, the Underground Railway, the development of the railway, the evolution of law and punishment, the development of the telephone and Standard Time, photography, fire fighting, bicycles, the Klondike Gold Rush, catalogue shopping, the postal service, and many other topics. The one problem I have with it relates to the glossy paper and the 91/2 by 113/4 inch size. It’s a somewhat cumbersome book and it’s hard to find a position where light isn’t reflecting off the pages. It turned out that it was easiest to read while sitting at the kitchen table.

Derek Hayes , a geographer by training, has a passion for old maps and what they can reveal about the past. He is the author of the bestselling Historical Atlas Series, which includes the Historical Atlas of Canada , Historical Atlas of Vancouver and the Lower Fraser Valley , Historical Atlas of the Arctic, Historical Atlas of Toronto and Historical Atlas of the United States . His website lists 15 books on a variety of geographical and historical topics.

The book provides a lot of material for trivial pursuit fans. For instance, did you know that:

  • Germans landed in Canada during the Second World War
  • Canada was valued at a billion dollars in 1872
  • a new boat was demonstrated in Toronto in 1897 that rolled over the
  • waves
  • up to 1930, Norway claimed a vast territory in Canada’s North
  • the first automobile crossed the Canadian Rockies in 1904 – by driving
  • on the rails of the Canadian Pacific
  • Canada once issued a 25 cent bill – and a $50,000 bill
  • Canada nearly had a flag with three maple leaves, not one
  • it was not until 1949 that all of Canada drove on the right
  • a major Canadian bridge collapsed not once but twice
  • the first transatlantic phone call was made in 1927 by radio
  • the first Canadian railway began running in 1836
  • the original “Red Indians” lived in Newfoundland
  • during the War of 1812 a cannon made in 1657 was used to defend
  • Toronto against the Americans
  • it took only a hour for French Canada to fall to the British
  • Canada’s first newspaper was the Halifax Gazette, published in 1752. It
  • was a single sheet of paper
  • one of the principal French forts is today a traffic island
  • France imported women into Canada, and then passed a law requiring men to marry them
  • Samuel de Champlain expected to find China at the western end of the Great Lakes
  • part of Canada is named after a brand of gin, and another after a beer

 

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