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Bookends: They didn’t mean to hurt anybody December 28, 2018

Posted by klondykewriter in Bookends, Klondike Sun, mystery, thriller, Uncategorized, Whitehorse Star.
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Bookends: They didn’t mean to hurt anybody

By Dan Davidson

February 7, 2018

– 838 words –

 

The Professionals

By Professionals copy

Putnam

372 pages

$27.50 hardcover

$12.99 paperback

 

 

Owen Laukkanen has been very busy over the last five years. There have been six books in his Stevens and Windemere series of mysteries. He’s been nominated for a slew of awards, won a couple and has graduated to full time writing after spending a number of years covering international poker games for a website called PokerListings.com.

In a way, his life story up to that point was a bit similar to that of the likeable villains in his first novel. His degree in creative writing from UBC wasn’t getting him anywhere in the world and he lucked onto the job writing about poker, a game about which he knew almost nothing when he started.

The merry band of kidnappers in this book started out in much the same place. They had degrees and debt and no hope of employment beyond being baristas at franchise coffee joints. They weren’t lucky enough to land a job writing about poker tournaments and travelling all over the world on the company dime.

Then one of them had a bright idea. Why not use the research skills they had to pick safe low level targets, kidnap them without actually ever hurting anyone, and operate so far below the radar that no one ever notices.

They saw themselves as modern day Robin Hoods, taking from the rich and giving to the poor, which just happened to be themselves. It would work out fine if they just remained professional about it.

For two years it did work out fine, and the four accumulated quite a bank account. They were slick, moved from state to state, picked mid-level wealthy marks who could afford a moderate ransom, and never hurt anybody.

Then, one of their carefully selected targets fell through, and since they had their plan for the area all set up, they went to the alternate choice, and it turned out that, although he looked pretty safe, they hadn’t looked deep enough. His wife was connected to organized crime.

Then, the mark heard one of their names, and their strong-arm man, who’d been getting little too much into the role of being a bad guy, shot him.

To back up just a little, the caper just before that hadn’t gone quite as planned, Usually, the marks were totally embarrassed and kept quiet about what had happened. That victim went to the police after he was freed. The case landed on the desk of state police investigator Kirk Stevens, whose instincts told him that this crime had been just a little too slick to be the first one.

Looking for others that might resemble it took him across state lines and involved the FBI, who gave the case to Carla Windermere.

About that time, the gang killed their latest victim, in yet another state, and the game was afoot.

Stevens is a family man with a wife and kids. She supports his police work, but she has a career of her own to nurture. Up to now, he hasn’t had to travel a lot. This case puts some strain on the dynamic of their marriage.

Windermere has an underemployed partner in a common-law relationship, which is pretty much coming apart at the seams.

The two agents are quite different people, something underlined by him being white and her black. What they do have in common is a love of the chase. Both have been feeling under appreciated in their respective jobs. There is a definite attraction between them, but neither one of them gives into it, at least, not in this first book.

We spend as much time with the kidnappers as we do with the authorities, Of the four – Pender (the planner), Sawyer (the muscle), “Mouse” (the hacker) and Marie (good on details) – we get to know Pender and Marie the most. They are presented quite sympathetically and we like them, but we feel for them as we watch them skip down that well known road to hell that is paved with good intentions.

We know this is not going to end well, and yet we wish it somehow could.

There is a third perspective on all of this, which makes it possible for us to spend some energy rooting for the kidnappers. They didn’t mean to hurt anyone, but the mob hired hit man who is sent to get them, in an investigation that parallels the official one, really is a bad guy, and means to misbehave is serious ways.

It’s acceptable for us to prefer the kidnappers to him and his cohort of killers.

If you’re trying to figure out just where this Vancouver based writer might fit in your library, he has impressive list of cover blurbs from other people who work this genre, including Steve Berry, Jonathan Kellerman, John Lescroart, John Sandford and Lee Child. There aren’t often that many for a first novel.

 

-30-

 

 

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